Monthly Archives: October 2017

What I Read in September

Damn. I haven’t written a post in almost a month. I really need to pay more attention to the blog.

Anyway, my reading month has been decent even with allergies kicking my ass.

Here is what I read last month:

A Most Dangerous Book by Christopher Krebs is an amazing exploration of Tacitus’s Germania and its tragic and malignant influence on German intellectual life to the Second World War. The best book I read in September.

I followed a five star book with another. Devil’s Bargain by Joshua Green is masterful. Green wonderfully captures the forces leading to Trump’s ascendancy to the presidency as well as giving a good look at Steve Bannon, who he is, what  his ideology is, etc. A must read for those interested in contemporary politics.

Next, I read Agatha Christie’s Hickory Dickory Dock. I love this book. That is all.

Following Christie, I read Soleri by Michael Johnston. I didn’t like the novel. I found the world building poor and tired. The hints of narrative left me less than impressed. And the characterization of the first primary character the reader is introduced to is rage inducing. A young man imprisoned since early childhood would not act in the way he does at the beginning of the novel. Then again, what evil empire would do such idiotic shit to begin with? (Batman influence not withstanding). But I do recognize I might be too harsh on Soleri and may give the novel another look in a few months.

Disappointment follows disappointment with The Vagrant by Peter Newman. I started loving the story. The narrative is fast paced and engrossing. But there is not much meat on the skeleton here. Characters are discarded before any characterization attaches to them (including the main protagonist). The world building, though interesting, doesn’t quite work. And the conclusion is a deus ex machina. I will read the sequel, The Malice, before unhauling both.

Painting Brilliant Skies & Water in Pastel by Liz Haywood-Sullivan is very good. Haywood-Sullivan is one of my favorite artists. The techniques she provides are wonderful. But I do wish she didn’t rely on underpainting washes so much. And, if you have seen one of her videos on the Artist Network, you pretty much cover the same material as covered in this book. A must read, nonetheless, for lovers of pastel.

South Africa: A Narrative History by Frank Welsh is a well loved single volume history of South Africa. Welsh’s history brings a sensitivity to the subject that elucidates what happened to make South Africa the racist nightmare it was for most of the twentieth century.

I don’t like Marius B. Jansen’s The Making of Modern Japan as much. It is still a very useful textbook. But it is too dry and overly scholastic for my taste.

I’m torn about my reaction to Bettany Hughes’s Istanbul: A Tale of Three Cities. I enjoyed the early history of Byzantion despite some obvious factual errors. But as Constantinople takes the stage, Hughes loses me as she writes the Christianization of the Roman Empire. And she never quite recaptures my interest. (It must be noted, however, that as I read Istanbul, I accompanied my mother to an all day doctor’s appointment.)

Following Istanbul, I took a look at The Locomotive of War by Peter Clarke. It was not what I had hoped it to be.

I finished September with two outdated books on the Hittites. The Hittites: People of a Thousand Gods by Johannes Lehmann has some interesting ideas. But it is very outdated. Similarly, The Hittites and Their Contemporaries in Asia Minor by J.G. Macqueen is interesting, but again outdated. A new history of the Hittites is desperately needed.

That was what I read in September. Now, let me see if I can post more frequently.

 

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