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What I Read in May

May has been an interesting month in terms of my reading. I read some really good books. And I read some stinkers. To be honest, I think I am in a mood for more science fiction and fantasy rather than realistic or literary fiction. I am also reading more books for research. And finding good and useful research texts is hit or miss.

Anyway, here is what I read in May:

I already reviewed Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee (which I loved) and The Night Ocean by Paul La Farge (which I hated).

The best book I read in May was Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames. It gets everything I want in a fantasy novel right. Just an awesome book.

I followed Kings of the Wyld up with Avengers of the Moon by Allen Steele and Borne by Jeff Vandermeer. Both books are disappointing. I enjoyed Steele’s reboot of Captain Future better than Vandermeer’s phoned in biopunk new weird novel.

I reread Sappho translated by Mary Barnard. I enjoyed the poems, but the don’t have the same impact they once had.

Keeping with Greek mythology, I read Colm Toibin’s House of Names. There is so much wrong with this novel. Especially the lack of consistency in narrative perspective. A worthy competitor with The Night Ocean for worse book I read this month.

I reread two novel by Kawabata Yasunari this month. Thousand Cranes and Master of Go lack the impact that they once had. This is similar to my experience with the poetry of Sappho. Maybe I am turning away from the literature I once loved.

To round out my fiction reading, I attempted The Root by Na’amen Gobert Tilahun. I like what I read. But taking a few days off to read other things ruined my desire to return to the book. I will return to it in a few months. Hopefully I will love it on the second attempt.

Before I touch upon the research texts, I want to skim over the graphic novels I read. I was not fond of Titans volume one “The Return of Wally West” (I do like the art though), Apocalypse Wars (a terrible idea in three comics), and Wonder Woman volume two “Year One” (the only part of Rucka’s jettisoning of the New 52 Wonder Woman I like is Nicola Scott’s artwork).

Now, what research books have I tackled?

The World of King Arthur by Christopher Snyder is a disappointing look at Arthurian myth. The First Decadent by James Laver is a disappointing (and likely dated) biography of J.K. Huysmans. The Road from Decadence, a collection of Huysmans’s letters is useful for Huysmans scholars, but not for what I want to write. I did enjoy the very useful Aleister Crowley: Magick, Rock and Roll, and the Wickedest Man in the World by Gary Lachman. Less enjoyable and useful is Janine Chapman’s The Quest for Dion Fortune. A. Norman Jeffares’s W.B. Yeats is an interesting if very dry biography of Yeats. The Etruscans by Raymond Bloch is not exactly what I want from a book on the Etruscans. Maybe a newer study/ history is in order? Another disappointing look at an ancient people is Jean Markale’s The Celts: Uncovering the Mythic and Historic Origins of Western Culture. 

I also read Tom Nichols’s The Death of Expertise. I enjoyed the book. Nichols raises many interesting and cogent concerns about current American culture. But I can’t help but point out that Nichols’s writing is hampered by repetition and the settling of political scores (who else is writing outside of their area of expertise besides Noam Chomsky, hmm?)

Finally, I want to return to novels before I close out what I read in May.

I am in a bit of a gay erotica craze at the moment. To satisfy my craze, I read Brad by Ken Smith. Where do I begin? I have so many issues with this novel that I want to do a detailed review. But would anyone want to read a review about a gay erotic novel?

That is what I read in May. On to June.

 

 

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2017 Book Haul Two

I’m late on this post. I intended on going to Golden’s Book Exchange the first week of March and picking up some books on sale. But circumstances prevented me from going. I’m hoping I can go in June (or earlier). We will see.

Anyway. While I did not go to Golden’s, I did accumulate quite a few books from Amazon and Alibris over the past few months.

Here they are.

From Alibris, I bought:

Brad by Ken Smith

The Black Halo by Sam Sykes

The Skybound Sea again by Sam Sykes

The Third God by Ricardo Pinto

Dragonfly Falling by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Hawkmoon by Michael Moorcock (an omnibus edition including The Jewel in the SkullMad God’s AmuletThe Sword of the Dawn, and The Runestaff)

The Black Unicorn by Tanith Lee

Starring Miss Marple by Agatha Christie (an omnibus edition including The Body in the LibraryA Murder is Announced, and They Do It With Mirrors)

Five Complete Poirot Novels by Agatha Christie (an omnibus edition including Murder on the Orient ExpressThirteen at DinnerThe ABC MurdersCards on the Table, and Death on the Nile)

From Amazon, I bought:

The Wall of Storms by Ken Liu

The Mirrored Empire by Kameron Hurley

Empire Ascendant by Kameron Hurley

Almost Infamous by Matt Carter

Twelve Kings of Sharakhai by Bradley P. Beaulieu

Blood on the Sand  by Bradley P. Beaulieu

Kings of the Wild by Nicholas Eames

Sins of Empire by Brian McClellan

The Vagrant by Peter Newman

The Malice by Peter Newman

Amberlough   by Lara Elena Donelly

The Garden of Stones by Mark T. Barnes

The Obsidian Heart by Mark T. Barnes

The Pillars of Sand by Mark T. Barnes

The House of Binding Thorns by Aliette de Bodard

The Daylight War by Peter V. Brett

The Skull Throne by Peter V. Brett

The Broken Eye by Brent Weeks

An Accident of Stars by Foz Meadows

A pretty impressive amount of books, I should think.

What will I haul next? We shall see.